Tutorials

Here you will find information about some of the techniques used in our patterns. If you have a question regarding a technique described here, or a technique from one of our patterns which we have not described, please do not hesitate to contact us by email (theauldwoollyalliance [at] gmail [dot] com). We will do our best to help you.

Quick access to techniques:

Support for specific designs can be found here:



Intarsia

Intarsia is a colourwork technique which involves  knitting blocks of colour, without carrying yarn at the back of the work: only one strand of yarn in one colour is used at a time. As a consequence, a separate ball of yarn (or some yarn wound onto a little bobbin) is needed for each block of colour.

The key to a neat piece of knitting in intarsia is to avoid holes where the colour changes occur. In order to achieve this, the two colours need to be “twisted” so the yarn for the new colour “traps” the old one.

Intarsia – Crossing yarns at colour change

When the changes of colour are stacked upon each other row by row, thus forming vertical lines, proceed as follow: knit with the “old” colour up to the change, hold this strand in front of the “new” colour (but still at the back of the work), catch the new colour and knit the first stitch of the new colour area, thus trapping the old colour between the new colour and the knitted fabric at the back of the work (see picture on the right).

Intarsia – View from the wrong side of work

After completing a few rows, the knitting should look like the picture on the left when viewed from the wrong side.

When the colour changes are not stacked perfectly, but “slant” to one side, the technique remains the same. Knit the stitches in one colour as per the pattern; when reaching the point where a change of colour is required, catch the new colour from below the old colour and knit the new stitch while trapping the old colour. This will create a diagonal “strand” of the old yarn at the back.



Provisional Crochet Cast-on

Caution - Sheep at Work



Turkish Cast-on

Turkish Cast-On is a technique that enables to start knitting in the round with no hole, gap, or twisted stitches, and starts by simply wrapping yarn around two tips of needle.

With your left hand, hold one tip of each of the two circular needles parallel to each other and pointing to the right. Hold* the tail of the yarn (leaving approx. 15-20 cm (6-8 in)) between your left thumb and the needle at the front.

With your right hand, wrap the working yarn three times around both tips from under the needles, away from you and back towards you over the needle tips (Photo 1). Pull the front needle tip so the wraps are now sitting on the cable, and knit with the needle at the back through the first 3 loops to create the first stitches (Photo 2: first stitch being worked; Photo 3: all 3 stitches worked, end of work on back needle).

Turn the work so the back needle is now at the front and knit the 3 other stitches on the other needle (Photo 4: first stitch being worked; Photo 5: all stitches worked, end of work for this round). (6 stitches, 3 on each needle)



Dimple Stitch

Dimple Stitch – Photo 1
Showing right side of fabric

Dimple Stitch produces an exaggerated texture which when knitted in a chunky yarn looks a bit like puffy sheep fleece.

Special abbreviation
gathering stitch -  take yarn to back of work as though to knit, insert needle from below under 3 strands,  knit the next st, bring the st out under the strands.

Dimple Stitch – Photo 2
Wrong Side of Fabric. Immediately below the needle you can see the 3 rows of ‘stranding’ which occur once rows 2, 3 & 4 or rows 10, 11 & 12 of the 16 row repeat have been worked.

Dimple Stitch – Photo 3
With wrong side of fabric facing, we begin to work the ‘gathering stitch’ by inserting the right needle ‘under 3 strands’

Dimple Stitch – Photo 4
Shows the right hand needle ‘under 3 strands’ and now beginning to ‘knit the next stitch’.

Dimple Stitch – Photo 5
The right needle has now been wrapped and the stitch brought through the ‘next stitch’

Dimple Stitch – Photo 6
Shows the stitch being brought out under the 3 strands. It may be helpful here to use the thumb of your left hand to guide the strands over the stitch.

Instructions:
Row 1 (RS) – Knit
Row 2 – P1, * sl 3 wyif, P3; rep from * to last 4sts, sl 3 wyif, P1.
Row 3 – K1, * sl 3 wyib, K3; rep from * to last 4sts, sl 3 wyif, K1.
Row 4 – As row 2
Row 5 & 7 – Knit
Row 6 – Purl
Row 8 – P2, * gathering st, P5; rep from * ending last rep with P2
Row 9 – Knit
Row 10 – P1, * P3, sl 3 wyif; rep from * to last 4sts, P4
Row 11 – K4, * K3, sl 3 wyib; rep from * to last st, K1
Row 12 – As row 10
Row 13 & 15 – Knit
Row 14 – Purl
Row 16 – P5, * gathering st, P5; rep from * to end

Repeat these 16 rows to form pattern.



(Reversible) Double Knitting

Reversible Double Knitting is a technique which consists in creating a two-layer double-sided and reversible piece of knitting, in one go. Using two colours, the finished item shows the same pattern (reversed) on both sides of the work.

Not only reversible Double Knitting produces a piece of knitting that is neat on both sides, with no “right” and “wrong” side, but it also creates a perfectly flat and balanced piece of work which does not curl back on itself, making it perfect for scarves or blankets.

In substance, for every stitch in the design, two stitches are actually worked: one knit stitch for the side facing the knitter, using one colour, and one purl stitch for the side facing away from the knitter, using the other colour. Consequently, giving the instruction for one side only is necessary and sufficient to work the whole piece of double knitting.

In a piece of work where Yarn A and Yarn B are used: the instruction “dblk5A” for instance (un-vented for the “Sheepy Draughts and a Wolf Too” design, by Aurelie Colas), will indicate that the next 5 double-stitches are to be worked so that Yarn A is used for the knit stitches, which translates as: *(take both yarns to the back; with Yarn A, knit 1; bring both yarns to the front; with Yarn B, purl 1), rep 5 times in total.

Video tutorial:



‘Heads and Tails’ – Toe Up Sock Workshop

The wrapping method used in the heel turn of this sock workshop is unusual. For those who have never wrapped stitches before it requires less steps to execute and is therefore slightly less ‘tricky’. It was invented by Jeny Staiman, who is also the author of ‘Jeny’s suprisingly stretchy bind off‘, my favourite cast off method for Toe Up socks. You can check out Jeny’s blog here and catch up with her on Ravelry here. The following is a photographic tutorial to guide workshop participants through the ‘Turning the Heel’ section of their notes.

Gusset increase complete, we are now ready to start 'Turning the Heel'

Image 1: Gusset increase complete, we are now ready to start ‘Turning the Heel’

Working the first ryo.  Note the yarn is coming from back, around the needle and finishing at the back of work.

Image 2: Round 1, needle 2 – Working the first ryo. Note the yarn is coming from back, will proceed around the needle and finish again at the back of work.

Round 1, needle 2 - The left hand needle is now passing the ryo (or yo) over the stitch just slipped in order to wrap it.

Image 3: Round 1, needle 2 – The left hand needle is now passing the ryo (or yo) over the stitch just slipped in order to wrap it.

The ryo (or yo) has been passed over and the slipped stitch is now wrapped.  Note horizontal bar at base of first stitch on right hand needle.

Image 4: The ryo (or yo) has been passed over and the slipped stitch is now wrapped. Note horizontal bar at base of first stitch on right hand needle.

Round 1, needle 1 - The second marker has now been placed on left hand needle.

Image 5: Round 1, needle 1 – The second marker has now been placed on left hand needle.

Round 1, needle 2 - The work has been turned to wrong side.  You will now work back and forth on needle 2 only.  You are ready to start Row 2.

Image 6: Round 1, needle 2 – The work has been turned to wrong side. You will now work back and forth on needle 2 only. You are ready to start Row 2.

Row 2 - Working the yrn.  Note the yarn comes from the front, around the needle and back to the front again.

Image 7: Row 2 – Working the yrn. Note the yarn comes from the front, around the needle and back to the front again.

Row 2 - The yarn is at front after yrn and the next stitch is slipped purl wise.

Image 8: Row 2 – The yarn is at front after yrn and the next stitch is slipped purl wise.

Row 2 - The left hand needle if lifting the yrn (or yo) over the stitch just slipped in order  to wrap it.

Image 9: Row 2 – The left hand needle is lifting the yrn (or yo) over the stitch just slipped in order to wrap it.

Row 2 - The stitch is now wrapped.  Note the horizontal bar at the base of the first stitch on right hand needle.

Image 10: Row 2 – The stitch is now wrapped. Note the horizontal bar at the base of the first stitch on right hand needle.


‘Heads and Tails’ – Toe Up Sock Workshop (continued)

It is common in sock knitting for a hole to appear at both points, where the top of the heel joins the instep. These holes will be more pronounced when working in a chunky weight yarn. To avoid this an extra stitch can be picked up before beginning Round 1 of ankle cuff.

Needle 1 in position to pick up additional stitches from needle 2.

Needle 1 is in position, ready to pick up additional stitches from
needle 2.

tip of needle 1, pick up 2 sts from the back, below last st on needle 2, P3tog, *k1, p1; rep from * to last stitch, slip this stitch onto a lockable stitch marker.

Pick up 2 sts from the back, below last st on Needle 2

Place slipped stitch from marker onto needle 2

Placing slipped stitch from marker onto Needle 2.

With free tip of needle 2, pick up 1 stitch from the back, below 2nd stitch on needle 2.

Pick up 1 stitch from the back, below 2nd stitch on needle 2.



Finishing Techniques Workshop – Photographic Tutorial

Due to requests from workshop participants this photographic tutorial consolidates the information given in the notes of my Finishing Techniques workshop. I hope the pictures will help to refresh techniques learned or discussed on the day. (It can all seem a bit of a blur, two weeks later!)  (A big ‘Thank You’ to my daughter Jenny who took all the lovely photographs.  Check out her Facebook page at JennyRosePhotography.)

Part One of the workshop covers sewing up.  The first gallery shows a mattress stitch seam worked on K1, P1 rib.

Click on individual pictures to enlarge and scroll through the images.

Gallery No 2,  shows a mattress stitch seam joining two pieces of stocking stitch.

Gallery No 3, shows a mattress stitch seam joining two pieces of garter stitch.

Gallery No 4, shows a mattress stitch seam joining two panels of moss stitch.

Gallery No 5 shows a mattress stitch seam joining 2 stocking stitch panels which are set at right angles to each other.  As if setting in a straight sleeve.

Gallery No 6 shows grafting of two panels of stocking stitch.  As if joining a straight shoulder seam.

Gallery No 7 shows how to join a band of garter stitch to a panel of stocking stitch.



Special Stitch: k-w2

Insert right needle into next stitch as if to knit. Wrap working yarn twice around the tip of the right needle, and resume knitting as normal.

The extra wrap created must be dropped as the slipped stitches are worked in the following round.

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One Response to Tutorials

  1. Pingback: Working with Wool to celebrate…sheep! | Wovember

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